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Zachary Stephen Layton – Best Kept Secret in the U.S. on Union Bay in Seattle

26 Nov

Consistently ranked among the top 20 universities in the world, Zachary Stephen Layton chose the University of Washington to earn his Bachelor’s degree in Biomedical Engineering.   UW is a public research university in Seattle, Washington founded in 1861.  It numbers among the oldest universities of the West Coast of the United States, and prides itself on one of the highest regarded medical schools in the world, which speaks even more highly of Zachary Stephen Layton’s choice of University of Washington for his career studies in biomedical engineering.  UW has three campuses: University District of Seattle, Tacoma and Bothell.

Zachary Stephen Layton

Zachary Stephen Layton

In 1854, Seattle was competing with other Washington Territory settlements for top spot in the rapidly developing West Coast.  Prominent Seattle residents like Daniel Bagley felt that the establishment of a university would enhance the position and prestige of the settlement.  Two fledgling universities were established initially, in Seattle and Lewis County, but no donated land was found for the Lewis County proposal, so the legislature settled on Seattle for the location in 1858.  Arthur and Mary Denny donated eight acres in 1861, with Edward Lander and Charlie and Mary Terry donating 2 more acres on Denny’s Knoll.  The University of Washington which Zachary Stephen Layton came to know so well was actually organized by the plans used for the 1909 Alaska-Yukon-Pacific Exposition, which was built on the undeveloped campus land of the time.   With the end of World War II, the G. I. Bill was an important source of growth for UW, spurring the opening of the medical school in 1946.  The University of Washington Medical Center is ranked today, by U.S. News and World Report, as one of the top ten hospitals in the U.S.

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Posted by on November 26, 2015 in Fishing, Science

 

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